Tuesday, July 27, 2004

Dr Gillian McKeith

Star of Channel Four's You Are What You Eat, and best-selling author of a book by the same name. I have been thoroughly wound-up by her show from the start. Her ideas on TV seemed a bit dubious, but were generally skated over. Subjects would lose weight by eating less and exercising more - hardly surprising. But her book is, in my humble opinion, pure quackery.

McKeith website

Her own website proclaims her to be the World's Top Nutritionist - a grand claim. Professor of Nutrition at Cambridge or Harvard perhaps? Her management list her education as:

EDUCATIONAL DEGREES
PhD, Doctorate in Nutrition; American College of Nutrition (Birmingham, USA)
MSc Nutrition, Masters Degree in Nutrition; American College of Nutrition
BA, Bachelors Degree in Neuroscience Linguistics & Language; University of Edinburgh (Scotland, UK)
MA, Masters Degree in Health Systems Management; University of Pennsylvania – Ivy League (Philadelphia, USA)

CERTIFICATES
London School of Acupuncture (London, UK)
Kailish Centre of Oriental Medicine - Kampo Herbology (London, UK)
East West College of Herbs - (San Diego, USA)
Australasian College of Health Sciences (Portland, USA) – pending Diploma in Herbal Medicine

A little investigation was required. I could find no American College of Nutrition in Birmingham, Alabama via directory enquiries. No surprise. There is a professional organisation based in Florida of the same name. However, it does not grant degrees.  I phoned the American College of Nutrition in Florida to check whether she might at least be a member or fellow, but they have no record of her. However, I was told that their executive director did write to the 'American College of Nutrition' in Alabama in the 199os requesting that they cease to operate under that name.

Note: in fairness, I have no reason to believe that Dr McKeith has ever claimed to have got her degree from the Florida organisation - but the confusion could easily arise as long as she uses the name 'American College of Nutrition' without the qualification that appears on her management website. The American College of Nutrition in Florida has a good deal of professional standing, so I wanted to be clear which one was being referred to.

Later, the Alabama organisation called itself the 'American College of Holistic Nutrition', which has now become Clayton College of Natural Health. As the Clayton website states, giving its history:

In the late 1970s Lloyd Clayton, Jr., N.D., who had recovered his own health through natural healing, established an eco-friendly herb company. Soon, his new company was inundated by customer inquiries regarding herbs and how to use them.
 
Delighted to discover such strong worldwide interest in natural health, he and his family members created two distance learning colleges in 1980: The Clayton School of Natural Healing and American Holistic College of Nutrition.

So, could it be that the 'World's Leading Nutritionist' got her PhD from a postal course? And what is the value of such a course?

Moreover, would the people she has accused of 'abuse' on TV, for feeding their kids junk, be so inclined to take such abuse from her if they knew she wasn't an MD? That her PhD is from a self-proclaimed degree-granting institute with accreditation from, it would appear, only other institutions that are self-proclaimed to grant accreditation?

In fact, her qualifications from prestige universities like Edinburgh and Penn seem to have been in subjects unrelated to her present role.

Of course, if she is in fact the World's Leading Nutritionist and can draw on some other evidence to support this claim, I'll gladly add it here.

Dr Gillian McKeith - Official website


45 Comments:

At 2:45 PM, Anonymous said...

So pleased someone has rumbled this pathetic, insulting women. I listen in sheer astonishment at some of the advice she has given to people on her show and somf of the crap she spurts and I shake my head in disbelief. The worst thing is, many people will be what she says to be true and will suddenly find themselves on harsh, calorie-restricting, nutrient-deficient diets (who ever said lean grille red meat was bad, and I can think of worse things than the odd lump of cheese).
p.s. I have an M.Sc. and a Ph.D. from Kings College London in Nutrition so I do know better

 
At 10:26 PM, Anonymous said...

I realised she was no proper dietician or doctor when she started looking at the eyes for iron deficiency and diagnosing from cracks in the tongue. Also I've never heard a properly qualified doctor recommend colonic irrigation.

When she said there was no nutritional value in pizza or ice cream I was astounded - surely pizza contains protein, vitamins A and D from the cheese, calcium ditto, carbohydrates and even B vitamins (from the flour). It is true that a diet consisting entirely of pizza and ice-cream would be high in fat and lacking in roughage, but surely the answer would be smaller portions and vegetables/salad on the side, rather than a diet based on mung beans and something like wallpaper paste, which nobody is likely to stick to anyhow?

It made me very angry to see that pizza all taken and thrown away - OK atavistic, but I was brought up not to waste food, and if they didn't want it I'm sure the nearest homeless shelter could have used it.

 
At 11:11 AM, Anonymous said...

I have no qualifications in nutrition, so am coming at "Dr" McKeith's book as an interested layperson. However, I definitely took issue with some of the statements in her book.

Such as "saturated fat turns to stone in the body" - huh? Would that be sedimentary, igneous or metamorphic stone?

I also find it hard to understand why she recommends that one eats oily fish such as salmon, but not herrings or shellfish. Surely the nutrition is as good with the fish she puts on the banned list?

She also makes erroneous statements regarding some foods. For example, she talks about eating "raw" cashews. In fact, I understand raw cashews to be highly toxic; all cashews sold for human consumption have already been roasted.

Overall, her book apears to contain a lot of stuff which is not backed up by controlled scientific study. Which makes me deeply suspicious of it.

 
At 11:27 AM, Anonymous said...

Hi,

I recently bought the book "you are what you eat", as I have seen the tv show and felt that I wanted to change my diet, and start to eat more fruit and veg. I was hoping that the book might give me ideas for different foods that I dont usually eat.

I was dubious about the tongue examining exercise, but thought there was probably some truth in the poo examining and was hoping for more details in the book.

HOWEVER, on reading the book I was sorely disappointed. Even if I could suspend reality to accept the theories on eating enzymes to help digestion (surely they wouldn't make it past the acidic conditions of the stomach without being denatured?), I could not believe my eyes when I saw the recommendation of homeopathic remedies! And the food combining seemed highly dubious, and obviously relying on the fact people may not know that digestion takes place in a number of different parts of the digestive system, and the body has a mechanism for adjusting the pH for effective use of the enzymes anyway! I have started eating a wider range of foods (some I hadn't even heard of before) thanks to the book. My diet was limited before, as I lived on mostly veggie sausage and cheese. But I think I could have just bought myself a good recipe book and had the same benefits, without all the nonsense surrounding it.

I was suspicious of her claims, which led me to doing some research on her and her research company, and using various methods could not find any papers written by her on the subject. Of course, this does not mean they don't exist, and if anyone knows of any, especially on the benefit of sprouts and their enzymes, I would love to read them. It does not surprise me of the doubt surrounding her qualifications, but it also does not surprise me that she has a two year waiting list, as she makes it all sound very appealing!

After reading the book I started to feel a bit stupid for falling for this sort of thing, but I honestly did believe that she might be a bit different from all the other promoters of diets. Sadly, I feel I may have been wrong.

 
At 8:32 AM, Anonymous said...

I bought this book for my fiancee, pleased that she was taking an interest in nutrition. We'd watched the show together and I was a little bit dubious.

Being a keen weight trainer I've done a lot of reading on nutrition. I was shocked to see it clearly state that too much protein would damage the kidneys (as well as destroying your bones and various other frightening things). I've read many articles on this which dispute it as an old myth. No study has ever shown protein to damage healthy kidneys, the only study that showed kidney damage was on those who already had kidney problems, and if you had those you'd know all about it. To make statements like this and present them as fact is ridiculous, surely the thousands of strong men/powerlifters/bodybuilders should all have dropped dead long ago from kidney failure if it were true, there is zero evidence for her claims.

We're also told red meat and dairy are inherently evil, no basis for these statements, they just are because the worlds top nutritionist says they are. At 25 I should be dead already yet I seem to be looking a lot better than Gillian who looks well over 50.

My concern is the office chatter will be you can't eat chicken with that pasta, red meat will kill you, you drank protein powder: see the doctor now. There's already enough myths about fitness and nutrition around without spreading more on prime time TV, I hope this information about her dubious credentials gets out as far as possible.

 
At 8:40 AM, Anonymous said...

I agree with the above poster re Gillian McKeith's attitude towards red meat. She continually paints it as the work of satan, but equally she bangs on about how important it is to get enough zinc. And what's the foodstuff that contains most bioavailable form of dietary zinc? Yup - red meat.

 
At 2:38 PM, Anonymous said...

Have a dekko at this - http://www.quackwatch.org/04ConsumerEducation/Nonrecorg/aanc.html. The reference to Gillian McKeith is towards the bottom, but you'll need to read all of it to get the full flavour.

 
At 9:27 AM, Anonymous said...

Watching 'You are what you eat' with interest, my first thought was to wonder how old Gillian McKeith is. I'd put her at around 60, with the deep lines around her eyes (too much sun?) and rather scrawny neck and hands - I also wondered if she was a smoker, as she has a typical smokers' pinched, lined mouth. I was shocked to discover she's only 45. If that's what her diet does for you, I'll stick to mine - I may be a little overweight, but at 53 with barely a line on my face, I look years younger than her. She is certainly not a good advertisement for her own regime!

 
At 12:22 PM, Anonymous said...

I bet that picture on her official website wasn't taken recently either (her agent's site, incidentally, has pulled the list of credentials). I was just reading today about the latest You are What You Eat, where she claimed that eating yeast, white bread and sugar would make yeast grow inside your gut and then make you ill when it burst out into the bloodstream.

 
At 3:51 PM, Anonymous said...

In fact, her qualifications from prestige universities like Edinburgh and Penn seem to have been in subjects unrelated to her present role.

It's tempting to ask the University of Edinburgh School of Informatics when they offered a BA in "Neuroscience Linguistics and Language". Unless there's a comma missing somewhere, pages about GMcK are the only ones I can find referring to such a course combination.

 
At 8:23 AM, Anonymous said...

Her most recent programme appeared to make the risible claim that eating white bread could cause athlete's foot. I also enjoyed her claims that she could diagnose poor diet by examining faeces. This series should be re-labelled 'alternative comedy' - it would be a ratings buster!

I notice that even the new-agey "Guardian" has also rumbled her. Ben Goldacre's excellent 'Bad Science' column does a good demolition job at http://www.guardian.co.uk/life/badscience/ .

Incidentally, I understand that Channel 4 did approach an internationally-renowned, science-based Institute involved in Nutrition research and asked them to provide someone properly qualified to act as a foil to GMcK. Although this might have made more interesting TV (there would have been a dogfight every week) the Institute scientists declined to have anything to do with the series, probably a sensible decision in the circumstances.

 
At 9:16 AM, Anonymous said...

In this area, I've never noticed the Guardian to be new-agey. It has consistently been the popular tabloids and broadcast media, not the Guardian, that have given uncritical publicity to every pseudoscientific New Age fad to come along.

 
At 1:09 AM, Anonymous said...

The Sun doesn't bear any grudges, it seems... After the recent hatchet job, now this positive coverage: Sunday August 15th, Chat to TV doc Gillian McKeith, a forthcoming webchat when she'll share her dietary tips.
- ray

 
At 3:36 PM, Anonymous said...

My original commnet about the 'New Agey' Guardian was aimed specifically at their nutrition advice, particularly the cranky 'Ask Emma' column in the Weekend magazine. The Guardian's stablemate 'The Observer' also publishes some pretty dubious advice from John Briffa (who does get it right about half the time, but the other half...) and as for the 'Barefoot Doctor', words fail me!

 
At 1:22 PM, Anonymous said...

I also agree with the comment regarding her own 'looks' I thought she was around 60 as well and as for being 45 - well that picture that has been splashed over her newly published book was probably either taken 20 years ago or airbrushed to extreme.

If she follows her own diet suggestions - I want no part of it - I would not want to look like that - scary !!

I am glad so many people have been helped by her hard regime though - perhaps her insults and strict eating habits will help them in future - and there is no doubt that their eating habits were dire.

I still think the old comment that 'everything in moderation' holds true - there is nothing wrong with red meats - or diary products - or pizza - its just that if thats all you eat you are not getting a good range of nutrients.

Most of the people in the programme never seemed to eat fruit or veg. I would never give up PIzza - but I do eat loads of fruit and veg.

Oh well - where there is a fad diet - someone will follow it and make the writer rich.................

 
At 9:58 PM, Anonymous said...

Like a previous poster I am a vegetarian who never took the time to learn how to cook with lentils, beans and the like, now I am with the help of her book and a good wholefood cook book. I'm glad the show was on because it was a wake up call to improve mine and my family's diet. I look at food in a different way now. I used to buy a lot of "low fat" processed foods with all kinds of junk and extra calories in. I'm now looking at healthier alternatives and trying to achieve a balance between indulgence, low fat, processed food, and wholesome food.

 
At 8:36 PM, Anonymous said...

Okay, I knew nothing about this woman until I went to buy my organic veg today. I am a terrible impulse buyer and saw her "Living Food vitamin C" bar, billed as a "superfood" and just got so curious and bought it... even though the price was over £1.50 and the wrapper was opaque! (daft, I know...)

I was surprised at how unappetising it looked when I opened it.. but eating it was far worse. It was the most disgusting bar of any description I have ever eaten. I actually had to eat it in two sessions as it was so nasty. About two minutes after each session I had to rush to the bathroom to clean my teeth as they ached so badly. It was like eating pure sugar. It was just a lump of sugar and fat. A diabetic would have been made really ill by this bar, yet the label doesn't give actual sugar content.

Even though it's my own fault for being so curious and stumping up the money, I actually feel quite outraged that this woman labels this bar a "superfood"! I cannot believe the rubbish that was posted on the label, including "with love and light" at the end of the ingredients section.

I visited her site for the first time tonight and was going to drop her an email to let her know what I thought, LOL, but it apparently has no email address. There are plenty of opportunities to hand over your credit card number though.

I haven't seen her show, but her site and her horrid product just scream out "fraudster".

 
At 1:13 PM, Anonymous said...

A dietician in the Times speaks out on McKeith's latest "love bar":

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/printFriendly/0,,1-142-1234291,00.html

Quote from the article:

“I would like to hear the opinion of the Advertising Standards Authority that the nutritional ingredients include ‘unconditional love and light’, and evidence that the ‘love powder’ can ‘feed ’ the sexual organs"

An hilarious read. A shame the dietician didn't actually sample this bar and give her opinion on the taste. IMO you'd be better off buying a curly wurly or tracker bar - for a fraction of the price you'd get similar nutritional value but with far more enjoyment in eating it!

 
At 12:08 PM, Anonymous said...

Now that is interesting – that the “Living Food Vitamin C” bar didn’t bear any nutritional information on the packaging. So as well as being a quack, Gillian McKeith is selling food in violation of the law?

The Food Labelling Regulations 1996 state that where a foodstuff is making a nutritional claim of some sort (e.g. “low fat”, “high fibre”) then information on the nutrition provided by that foodstuff MUST be displayed on the label, in a specified format (you know the one: energy, protein, carbohydrate, fat, fibre, sodium per 100g). If any specific nutrient is also claimed, this must also be stated – here, Vitamin C should be included in the information.

And guess what? Contravention of the Regs is a criminal offence.

I’d get onto the Food Standards Agency if I was you.

Posted by Georgie Godby, email sumocat@dsl.pipex.com.

 
At 3:09 PM, Anonymous said...

Gillian McKeith appeared out of nowhere here in the UK around four years ago and started calling herself 'the world's greatest nutritionist' who had a two year waiting list. She got her dodgy PhD from Clayton College of Natural Health via postal course in 1997. How could she be the world's top nutritionist three years later with a two year waiting list?

She fed this tale to the press, who are always on the lookout for new topics and people to write about. Many of them copied her press releases saying she was treating royalty, top athletes and celebrities and was well known in the US from being on the Joan Rivers Show - strangely when the Mail on Sunday tried to verify this - the Joan Rivers Show had no record of her and according to the Mail on Sunday, virtually all of her other claims and qualifications were also a lie.

She has since gone on to become very successful, with her book having been a bestseller and newspapers and magazines falling over themselves to feature her and again repeat may of the untrue flattering things she said about herself. She now has the advantage of being able to quote publications saying she is the world's greatest nutritionist e.g. on her website www.gillianmckeith.com, she attributes it to the Daily Mail.

She is already becoming very rich and as it stands, she is still getting away with it. According to Dr Steven Barrett who runs quackwatch.com, the US is awash with people like this making big bucks (- interestingly, she claims to have lived in the US for 15 years). He also says about Clayton College where she got the 'PhD': 'For academic and scientific qualifications, Clayton College is absulutely worthless - actually it is worse than worthless because anyone who comes out of there will be incompetent as they teach non-scientific nonsence. As far as nutrition education goes, it would be better to do nothing than go to Clayton because at least you would then still have your common sense left in tact.'

 
At 9:31 PM, Anonymous said...

Anyone who missed the Mail on Sunday expose on Gillian McKeith can still read it at http://www.fmwf.com/C2B/PressOffice/display.asp?ID=595&Type=1
It is a fairly long read, but worth persisting until the end.

 
At 7:50 PM, Anonymous said...

i have tried gilliians so called diet of abundance and i can say that it is impossible. To consume all the supplements recommended would cost a fortune. The diet is so restrictive and due to most peoples lifestyle could not be followed for more then a few days. I think that she is laughing all the way to the bank

 
At 7:51 PM, Anonymous said...

i have tried gilliians so called diet of abundance and i can say that it is impossible. To consume all the supplements recommended would cost a fortune. The diet is so restrictive and due to most peoples lifestyle could not be followed for more then a few days. I think that she is laughing all the way to the bank

 
At 10:56 PM, TenAlleyRaman said...

oH Dear! Channel 7 in Australia have fallen for this one!

 
At 11:31 PM, TenAlleyRaman said...

Oops! my mistake! Channel 9 in australia features her sadistic program!

 
At 11:09 AM, Anonymous said...

"I visited her site for the first time tonight and was going to drop her an email to let her know what I thought, LOL, but it apparently has no email address. There are plenty of opportunities to hand over your credit card number though."

I found her email address under the within one of the articles promoting her status as "doctor" in the http://www.althealth.co.uk site. It is a shame they havent removed that absolute rubbish yet ;D

But her details are as follows:

Dr Gillian Mc Keith
Leeds
West Yorkshire
LS3 1YN

Tel: 020 74919 722

Email: gmckeith@bonasana.com

 
At 5:24 PM, Anonymous said...

I have just finished my PhD and it makes me angry and concerned to think that anyone can buy a 'doctorate' from a university that doesn't exsist. Surely this is illegal?

 
At 11:53 PM, Anonymous said...

i think gillian has given a lot of people a good kick up the backside to stop eating rubbish eat healthy lose weight feel and look better her programe is great

 
At 10:45 AM, Anonymous said...

I have been following Gillians guildelines for some time now and have never felt or looked better.

 
At 10:15 AM, Anonymous said...

Wow! What a load of negativity! Anyone who can get people (including myself) eating more fresh fruit, fresh veggies and more fish and less meat can't be all bad. Ignore all the happy, clappy crap and just go for the fresh food and lots of it! As for digestive enzymes, if you are eating a healthy diet (see above) you shouldn't need them; but having said that, some people digestions just do not work all that well (mine included) and I find them helpful. You just have to make up your own mind!

 
At 12:56 PM, Anonymous said...

Wouldn't it be great if somebody with the (valid) neccessary qualifications would revamp her book and tell us what parts of her advice are rubbish and what parts are actually good? That should sell well and it could be done without all the toecurling pseudo scientific claims...

 
At 4:51 AM, Anonymous said...

I HAVE BEEN FOOLED BY THE DIET TO,
I ASK MY DIATISION HERE ADDVICE SHE SAID RUBBISH SHE WOULD LIKE TO SEE THE PEOPLE IN HER SHOW 6 TO 12 MONTHS LATER SO SEE IF THEY HAD GAINED WEIGHT, AS A HELTHLY EATING PLAN SHOULD BE ONE YOU CON FOLLOW FOR LIFE GILL'S IS NOT ONE OF THEM!

 
At 7:27 PM, Marie Denley said...

Can't abide the woman and her vile manners personally. Perhaps her aggressive style helps a rare few, but having co-ordinated a free voluntary online weight management group for nearly two years now, I've found that a mix of support, gentle chivvying, sharing experience, and wry humour is enough. Most obese people are quite good enough at kicking their own metaphorical backsides (OK, oddly athletic for fatties, I realise!) and losing self-esteem without her 'help'.

As a retired academic (funnily enough from King's too, though not in the nutritional field), I don't like being taken for a ride about people's professional qualifications. I am grateful for Ben Goldacre's exposure of the dodginess of her claims.

I will put in one good word for her, to be fair. Her recipes in the 'You are what you eat' companion Cookbook are really good, imaginative, appetising and healthy. They take a little longer than she says, though most are still quick, but maybe I am slowing down in my dotage.

Perhaps if she stuck to writing cookery books rather than waving her questionable assumptions and qualifications around in an aggressive way, she could do people some good by interesting them in imaginative use of healthy foodstuffs. MD (not medical!)

 
At 12:58 PM, Paladin said...

Well between the pair of us (my girlfriend and I) we both got the books - the You Are What You Eat and the Accompanying cookbook.

The recipes are essentially horrid. Some do look like someone has listed the ingredients, randomly plucked a cooking method and simply written the thing down without ever actually making the goo!

That being said, if like me you have not really got a clue what is a good idea to sling in the pot then at least it opens the door to your own new healthy diet. This is kind of referrenced in Gillian's words in the preface.

The fact that you can now key in Dr Gillian Mckeith and have Google serve up any number of web sites slating her and her pointless qualifications is of no surprise to me after all we are in the UK where the press believes in the practice of lambasting anybody of a celebrity status - just as soon as the celeb in question has done anything wrong (like to make ridiculous claims about her Educational background).

The net result of each episode is that the individual featured is then presented two months later and lo and behold are two - four stones lighter. Must be all that fresh fruit and veg, more exercise and the fact that a lot of the ingredients cost so much to buy the poor sod has been on overtime for the last two months and hasn't had the time to prepare and eat the watery crap Dr Gill propagates!

I myself have a real problem with the out and out fantastic claims from the Gadgets section of her web site:
" L’Equip RPM BLENDER
There is no other Blender like it. This is one of the most powerful domestic blenders available and boasts of so many other beneficial features. The rugged brushed metal base has a single speed control and a rev-counter panel which add to its appealing style and simplicity. The sheer power delivered to the German designed blade cuts blending times and guarantees a smooth result with everything from soups to smoothies. Its action helps to retain maximum nutrient content and enzymes. A truly first class Blender for the health conscious person.
"

All this for just £119.00 even thouth any electrical retailer will let you have a far more advanced one from Kenwood and the likes for about £30.00 less. And just what is this enzyme-unsmashing action? Is the spin of the motor lubricated by Extra Virgin Olive oil? Why the lies?

Good luck to her really, if she makes a mint after shelling out for her bogus degrees then I for one take my hat off to her.

For me, I have lost one stone in two months by following some of her guidelines and by going to the gym, in reality anyone can do that!

 
At 1:18 PM, Paladin said...

Well between the pair of us (my girlfriend and I) we both got the books - the You Are What You Eat and the Accompanying cookbook.

The recipes are essentially horrid. Some do look like someone has listed the ingredients, randomly plucked a cooking method and simply written the thing down without ever actually making the goo!

That being said, if like me you have not really got a clue what is a good idea to sling in the pot then at least it opens the door to your own new healthy diet. This is kind of referrenced in Gillian's words in the preface.

The fact that you can now key in Dr Gillian Mckeith and have Google serve up any number of web sites slating her and her pointless qualifications is of no surprise to me after all we are in the UK where the press believes in the practice of lambasting anybody of a celebrity status - just as soon as the celeb in question has done anything wrong (like to make ridiculous claims about her Educational background).

The net result of each episode is that the individual featured is then presented two months later and lo and behold are two - four stones lighter. Must be all that fresh fruit and veg, more exercise and the fact that a lot of the ingredients cost so much to buy the poor sod has been on overtime for the last two months and hasn't had the time to prepare and eat the watery crap Dr Gill propagates!

I myself have a real problem with the out and out fantastic claims from the Gadgets section of her web site:
" L’Equip RPM BLENDER
There is no other Blender like it. This is one of the most powerful domestic blenders available and boasts of so many other beneficial features. The rugged brushed metal base has a single speed control and a rev-counter panel which add to its appealing style and simplicity. The sheer power delivered to the German designed blade cuts blending times and guarantees a smooth result with everything from soups to smoothies. Its action helps to retain maximum nutrient content and enzymes. A truly first class Blender for the health conscious person.
"

All this for just £119.00 even thouth any electrical retailer will let you have a far more advanced one from Kenwood and the likes for about £30.00 less. And just what is this enzyme-unsmashing action? Is the spin of the motor lubricated by Extra Virgin Olive oil? Why the lies?

Good luck to her really, if she makes a mint after shelling out for her bogus degrees then I for one take my hat off to her.

For me, I have lost one stone in two months by following some of her guidelines and by going to the gym, in reality anyone can do that!

 
At 4:18 PM, Justme said...

I think that the proof of the pudding is the way the people on her programme shine after being on her recommended healthy foods for a while. They really all do look fantastic and are an inspiration to the rest of us to - at the very least get out there and eat our 5 fruit and veg a day (something I seldom do).

 
At 5:18 PM, Anonymous said...

I am so glad that other people have noticed the amount of psueoscientific nonsense this woman says on both her TV show and in her book. I think that although she generally advises people to eat more healthily in terms of increasing the amount of fruit and veg we eat as well as cutting down on high fat foods which seems to be good common sense, the "scientific" theories behind her advice are at best unproven and at worst just plain fantasy. Giving people false advice about their diet is a dangerous practice and I can't believe that someone whose credentials are so dubious could make it onto national TV and present herself as a nutritional expert! Who checks peoples CV's at Channel 4?

All this aside, I have concerns with the communication of scientific knowledge to the public. If people present psuedoscience such as this as being fact to the public, it reflects badly on the real scientific community who are trying to communicate scientific data to the public in an unbiased and thorough way. By allowing people to present fiction as fact, it takes credibility away from real scientific information and only contributes to the publics general distrust of science.

I also agree with the person who has just finished their PhD from an ealier comment - I am doing a PhD at the moment and when I found out you could just buy on on the internet I thought What's the point in doing al this work?!

 
At 5:45 PM, Andrew said...

God, you people should direct your anger at something worth getting angry about. You're all playing into the hands of the pharmaceutical companies who wish us to all exist in a permanent state of illness

 
At 3:52 AM, wocky said...

wow. This has all got me gobsmacked. I've been given a copy of GMcK's cookbook, and I was searching around on the internet to get a few more recipe ideas (have exhausted what is offered by her).

I can't believe the contraversy, the energy that's going in to discussing her. obviously, she says some pretty full-on things, and has fibbed her way through building up her career.

But as far as i can see, she seems to be saying the sort of things most naturopaths (also many GPs) are saying; that we need to be careful of letting yeast (candida albicans) build up in our bodies, and to combine foods in order to aid digestion. So having heard this message many times over, I wasn't surprised to read GMcK's version of it. It's easy to overlook the waffle that she's tacked on to it.

I've also never seen the show (though apparently it is airing here in Australia as well), which does sound pretty extreme by the accounts I've been reading. But as for the argument over reading peoples' tongues - the chinese doctors have been doing that for centuries, have they not? I know I saw an accupuncturist years ago who used to begin every consult in that way.

The overriding point would seem to be that if she IS improving peoples' eating habits, and therefore their health, is the outcome worth quibbling over? Perhaps, if what she is doing is dangerous (as I've pointed out,I can't really judge that.) If she's just a fanatic whose objectives and achievements help others, then is there any harm done? (Apart from the fact that no-one likes to feel decieved. Or that they worked their arse off for a PhD when someone else got it for 20 quid!)

 
At 4:57 PM, Anonymous said...

My yahoo search for "kill gillian mckeith" has proved very successful in finding others at last who agree with me that this woman talks shite! Has anyone noticed how lately in her series she has now started saying "It is my belief..." before then going onto moaning about some such food that she says is bad for you? Maybe Channel 4 will give me a program then, as long as i say "it is my belief" before i start speaking my own bulls**t!!!

 
At 1:57 PM, Anonymous said...

You are correct in assuming Clayton College is complete rubbish. It is not licensed or accredited from any legitimate accrediting agency. The same goes for their sister school, owned by the same individual, American College of Computer and Information Sciences. The degree(s) she possesses from Clayton are as worthless as the paper they are printed on. They were simply bought and paid for, no more no less.

 
At 2:01 PM, Anonymous said...

Lloyd Clayton of Birmingham, Alabama operates a number of diploma mills. (An organization that awards degrees without requiring its students to meet educational standards for such degrees established and traditionally followed by reputable institutions. [Pollution in Higher Education; Efforts of the US Dept. of Education in relation to degree mills, USOE, 3/74.]) Included are the Clayton School of Natural Healing, Chadwick University, and the American Holistic College of Nutrition (and American College of Computer and Information Sciences or A.C.C.I.S.) (Clayton also sells "Dr. Clayton's herbals and homeopathics.") Although the Clayton "schools" operate in Alabama, they are not licensed there. Alabama's Department of Education attempted to close Clayton down in 1981, but Clayton fought it legally. The State Attorney General opined that the "schools" would not be required to be licensed if they offered no programs to Alabama citizens.

[Joe Miller, Private School Licensure Section, Alabama Dept of Education, letter 9/18/95]

Comment: The AG's action gave sanctuary to a socially despicable operation. This apparently does not please the Dept of Education, but its hands are tied. Mr. Miller is to be thanked for being forthright in his response to our questioning on the status of the Clayton "schools." (Clayton "schools" are "accredited" only by an accreditation mill!)

 
At 11:29 AM, Anonymous said...

Blimey don't people waste a lot of their time and energy complaining in this country! Granted, i just sat and read all the comments with interest but as i was doing so i couldn't help thinking that really, just a teeny little bit, it seemed that a lot of people were effed off that they didn't realise the money spinning potential before Mc Keith! Let's face it, anybody who believes any other person wholeheartedly and without reservation is either a child or a moron. I don't see too many of them on this website - bizarre! The site should be renamed Moral Guardians of the Masses. Or perhaps i've missed the point? (double irony) Best go now and take my gluten free squash bread out the oven - damn it smells good!

 
At 1:33 AM, Anonymous said...

I am very grateful that you have brought to light the numerous schools claiming to be legitimate like CCNH who claims you can become a Doctor over the internet??? The only school I have found to be ligit is the Australasian College of Health Sciences as they are accredited by a USDE accrediting body, but this credential that she claims to have is pending?? Maybe it takes work and not just money to get one of their diplomas or degrees?? I did check these guys out and they seem pretty above board. Also check out quakwatch.com to see what they say about Clayton College. I do give her credit for being the most pompous crook with an art of to lie through her teeth to make millions.

 
At 1:39 AM, Anonymous said...

On an added note not all natural health is bullshit. I have had some pretty good things happen from stopping quiting smoking and takeing B vitgs . But to be real if you are interested in good classes that aren't a rip off or bogus check our www.achs.edu they are not big but true to sorts and have great staff. I don't know if this nut job is a student but I doubt she could pass their classes.

 

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